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Emergency Contraceptive

Emergency contraceptive, commonly known as the morning-after pill, is a medication used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure. It works by preventing ovulation, altering the uterine lining, and thickening cervical mucus. The pill should be taken as soon as possible after intercourse, ideally within 72 hours. It can significantly reduce the risk of pregnancy, but it is not 100% effective. Temporary side effects may occur, such as nausea and irregular bleeding. Emergency contraceptive pills are available

Best medications for Emergency Contraceptive

Drug NameClassRouteStandard DosagePrice
Plan B One-StepProgestinsOral1.5 MGfrom$182.76
EContra One-StepProgestinsOral1.5 MGfrom$182.76
Take ActionProgestinsOral1.5 MGfrom$182.76
EllaProgestin Agonist/AntagonistsOral30 MGfrom$1125.17

Emergency Contraceptive

Emergency contraceptive, also known as the morning-after pill, is a medication used to prevent pregnancy after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure (such as a condom breaking or missing birth control pills). It is an effective back-up option for preventing unintended pregnancies when regular contraception methods have failed or were not used.

How Does It Work?

Emergency contraceptive pills typically contain a hormone called levonorgestrel. This hormone works by preventing or delaying ovulation, which is the release of an egg from the ovary. It may also alter the lining of the uterus, making it less receptive to an embryo. Additionally, emergency contraceptive pills can thicken cervical mucus, making it more difficult for sperm to reach the egg.

When Should It Be Taken?

Emergency contraceptive pills should ideally be taken as soon as possible after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure, but they can be effective up to 72 hours (depending on the specific brand) after intercourse. It is important to note that the efficacy decreases with time, so the sooner it is taken, the more effective it is at preventing pregnancy.

Effectiveness

When taken within the recommended time frame, emergency contraceptive pills can significantly reduce the risk of pregnancy. However, no method of contraception is 100% effective. Studies have shown that emergency contraceptive pills can prevent approximately 75-89% of pregnancies when taken within 72 hours of unprotected sex.

Side Effects

While emergency contraceptive pills are generally safe, they may cause some temporary side effects. These can include nausea, vomiting, fatigue, breast tenderness, irregular bleeding, and dizziness. These side effects typically resolve on their own and do not pose a long-term health risk.

Availability

Emergency contraceptive pills are available without a prescription in many countries and can be obtained at pharmacies, family planning clinics, and some healthcare providers. In some regions, they may be available over-the-counter or through online pharmacies. It is important to consult a healthcare professional for guidance on the specific availability and regulations in your area.

Considerations

Emergency contraceptive pills should not be used as a regular method of contraception. They are intended for emergency situations and should not replace routine contraception. It is important to discuss ongoing contraceptive needs with a healthcare provider to identify a suitable method that aligns with personal preferences, lifestyle, and medical history.

In conclusion, emergency contraceptive pills are an effective option for preventing unintended pregnancies when regular contraception methods have failed or were not used. They work by preventing or delaying ovulation and altering the uterine lining. While they come with temporary side effects, they are generally safe. It is crucial to take emergency contraceptive pills as soon as possible after unprotected sex or contraceptive failure and to consider discussing ongoing contraception needs with a healthcare professional.